Discipleship, Extravagance, Fear, Worship

Undignified Worship.

So David went to bring up the ark of God from the house of Obed-Edom to the City of David with rejoicing. 13 When those who were carrying the ark of the Lord had taken six steps, he sacrificed a bull and a fattened calf. 14 Wearing a linen ephod, David was dancingbefore the Lord with all his might, 15 while he and all Israel were bringing up the ark of the Lord with shouts and the sound of trumpets.

16 As the ark of the Lord was entering the City of David, Michal daughter of Saul watched from a window. And when she saw King David leaping and dancing before the Lord, she despised him in her heart.

17 They brought the ark of the Lord and set it in its place inside the tent that David had pitched for it,and David sacrificed burnt offerings and fellowship offerings before the Lord. 18 After he had finished sacrificing the burnt offerings and fellowship offerings, he blessed the people in the name of the Lord Almighty….

When David returned home to bless his household, Michal daughter of Saul came out to meet him and said, “How the king of Israel has distinguished himself today, going around half-naked in full view of the slave girls of his servants as any vulgar fellow would!”

21 David said to Michal, “It was before the Lord, who chose me rather than your father or anyone from his house when he appointed me ruler over the Lord’s people Israel—I will celebrate before the Lord.22 I will become even more undignified than this, and I will be humiliated in my own eyes. But by these slave girls you spoke of, I will be held in honour.”

Just to put this passage into a bit of context, the Ark of the Covenant had departed from Jerusalem, which symbolised the absence of God’s Presence with his people. It was a bad sign. So, imagine the joy of the Ark’s return to Jerusalem, more than just “we’ve got our treasurer back” but rather a symbol of God’s returning presence, blessing and splendour to the capital city at the heart of the nation.

David is over-joyed, he is uncontainable, he orders sacrifice of bullocks every few feet, it was messy, it would have been costly to the countries economics, but David wasn’t skimping on the pennies when he was showing God his adoration, love and loyalty.

David, get’s carried away with his worship too, he is dancing before the Lord with all of his might, so much so that he looses his Kingly robes and is dancing in his Ephod (Hebrew for boxer shorts). He is worshipping unrestrained and uninhibited in his worship of God, and then his wife tells him off, she is scornful and shames him, she tells him his being a disgrace and being unkingly, setting a bad example.

How often are we passionate about something, and then someone pours a bucket of cold water over it, the bubble is burst, we are deflated? Yet, not David, he wont be dissuaded from the worship of God.

It made me wonder whether we let “what people think of us?” influence our worship, praise, discipleship and generally our walk following Jesus?

Mike Pilivachi wrote an amazing book on worship which was called “for the audience of one” the idea that we live primarily not for human approval but (to quote a book title by Andy Hawthorn) living our life for the “smile of Jesus”, living primarily to bless and please him.

I wonder too, am I sometimes like Michel, David’s Queen, do I ‘cut people off from worship’ by my attitude and the baggage -her view of ‘propriety’.

David is not being dissuaded from his worship with his line “I’ll become even more undignified than this”.

David is holding nothing back, he’s not playing at worship, not just going through the motions. David is for real.

He is being authentic in his response, just as David is equally authentic in his response when he is struggling and writing psalms of lament, he is sharing his heart openly and publicly with God, and in doing this he is actually leading his people in worship, he is showing true surrender to the greater King, the Lord Almighty.

This is a shocking image, rulers don’t humble themselves in public, but here David is humbling himself before his God, saying to his people “I might be you King, but I am bowing my knee before God”.

I remember Sam, who used to work with me, saying “just imagine Queen Elizabeth II in her pants”. It is a shocking image. It says to the people, “I’m the King, and I know I am not greater than God, however great you think you are, you are not greater than him either!”

Too often in Britain we have become too influenced by the Victorian period where we struggle to express any emotion -either happy or sad- and a more extreme emotion makes us feel uncomfortable.

Yet here David is showing extravagance in worship, too often we try and tone everything down so as not to cause offence, yet here David was unashamed, perhaps we need to discover afresh something of this unashamedly passionate about the presence of Father God for the Church to thrive in the 21st Century.

There  is a phrase in the Bible about being a “Fool for Christ” -although perhaps from the view of eternity a good question might be to ask “who is fooling who?”

The Bible talks of our whole lives being a Spiritual Act of worship (Romans 12) and I wonder  “Am I prepared to be a fool for Christ?” -Am I prepared to risk it all -my pride, my reputation (or whatever it is for you)- for the sake of Christ?

The Band Delirious sand “I’m not ashamed of the Gospel, I am not ashamed of the one I love” -but perhaps maybe sometimes we do get a little ashamed?

Maybe when we hit these moments, perhaps we need something of the cry of David within us, spurring us on and leaving comfort and mediocrity far behind, as we  say “I’ll be even more undignified than this”, or in other words “you ain’t seen nothing yet!”

Perhaps that is the phrase for this generation, if you think we are too bold, to out there, to radical, too noisy, too non conformist, too revolutionary, to Jesus-like then let’s echo the Spirit of David and say “we’ll become even more undignified than this! In you are looking at my discipleship following Christ, you ain’t seen nothing yet!”

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